literarydc

Poets, Writers, and Indie History

Sally Rosen Kindred

 

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Sally Rosen Kindred  is a native of North Carolina living in Maryland. She has received fellowships from the Maryland State Arts Council and the Virginia Center for Creative Arts. In addition to her books, she has published two chapbooks, Garnet Lanterns–winner of the 2005 Anabiosis Press Prize–and Darling Hands, Darling Tongue (Hyacinth Girl Press, 2013), a set of poems about the girls of Neverland. Her poems have appeared in Blackbird, Quarterly West, Verse Daily, and other journals.

A Margaret Knight Sanford Creative Writing Scholar at Duke University, she received her MFA from the University of Maryland. Her awards include the Anne Flexner Poetry Prize, an Individual Artist Fellowship from the Maryland State Arts Council, and a residency at the Mary Anderson Center for the Arts. She has taught creative writing at the Pittsburgh Center for the Arts and the Johns Hopkins University Center for Talented Youth. She lives in Columbia, Maryland.

[From: Amazon and Mayapple Press]

 

7094905.jpg    2006

 

51o1awovk8L.jpg   2011

 

Kindred’s first book is set in a blessed half-light a South Carolina evening fragrant with apples, the “boiling quiet” of a kitchen, or, in a series of poems inspired by Noah’s story, the crowded hold of an ark, where adders lurk in the warm straw. These densely resonant poems testify to danger and grief but they also smolder with love, gratitude, and awe. Having endured her own flood of “wolf-colored waves,” and fully acknowledging how predatory the world can be, Kindred plants herself on earth and insists, Survive with me.” –Lesley Wheeler

 

large-cover-darlinghands.jpg    2013

 

51DxuyIl8+L._SX326_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg   2014

 

The linguistic blooms in Book of Asters are like the breathtaking visual turns of a kaleidoscope dazzling, unexpected, and unnerving. Sally Rosen Kindred is the kind of poet Shelley meant when he called poets the unacknowledged legislators of the world. A language this lush and an imagination this inventive can remake us as surely as Kindred’s narrators are remade, joy by joy, grief by grief. Kindred is a poet willing to follow her muse and name her vision. Book of Asters is a vivid, astonishing collection. –Kathryn Kirkpatrick

Sally Rosen Kindred cites star as Greek root of aster, and these poems themselves are star-flowers. Asters, alders, dandelions, children, animals, a worm, soldiers, other numinous existences, reply with hidden essences to her questing inwardness, as she names them into our recognitions. These poems fuse concept and sound in a manner now unusual, so that obscured humble things appear nakedly valuable to our eyes and to our spirits. In her wise innocence, the world stands brightly recreated, splendid and difficult and painful to behold, in the noontime sunlight of her craft. –James Applewhite

Sally Rosen Kindred has a gift for creating poems I wish I’d written. Here is a garden of witness, of forgetting, of memory and music and love s bright blare. Aster as metaphor, aster as ghost bouquets of common weeds and wildflowers haunt us in these poems, and teach us to lean toward their mysterious light, to blossom with their stories, and to grow bruised, but fed by their songs. –Meg Kearney

Sally Rosen Kindred cites star as Greek root of aster, and these poems themselves are star-flowers. Asters, alders, dandelions, children, animals, a worm, soldiers, other numinous existences, reply with hidden essences to her questing inwardness, as she names them into our recognitions. These poems fuse concept and sound in a manner now unusual, so that obscured humble things appear nakedly valuable to our eyes and to our spirits. In her wise innocence, the world stands brightly recreated, splendid and difficult and painful to behold, in the noontime sunlight of her craft. –James Applewhite

Sally Rosen Kindred has a gift for creating poems I wish I d written. Here is a garden of witness, of forgetting, of memory and music and love s bright blare. Aster as metaphor, aster as ghost bouquets of common weeds and wildflowers haunt us in these poems, and teach us to lean toward their mysterious light, to blossom with their stories, and to grow bruised, but fed by their songs. –Meg Kearney

 

 

stfttg-frontcover.jpg   2018

 

 

Issue Eighteen: Sally Rosen Kindred | The Adroit Journal

No Eden – Sally Rosen Kindred

Sally Rosen Kindred

Sally Rosen Kindred: “Fairy Tale for Mother and Teenage Son”

http://baltimorereview.org/index.php/winter_2013/contributor/sally-rosen-kindred

https://blackbird.vcu.edu/v5n2/poetry/kindred_s/index.htm

http://www.thrushpoetryjournal.com/september-2018-sally-rosen-kindred.html

 

Interview

https://www.massreview.org/node/7133

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